breastfeeding Tag

Should I build a breastmilk freezer stash?

A breastmilk freezer stash serves an obvious purpose if you’re planning to return to work soon. However, a stash can be useful for any mom, including stay-at-home moms. Why? A freezer stash provides you with freedom if you want a night out on the town or if an unexpected emergency calls you away from your little one. It’s also a fail-safe if you have any other unanticipated breastfeeding interruption. If you’re using pumping to boost your milk supply, a freezer stash makes the best use of those extra pumping sessions. Some super-producers even donate a portion of their stash to moms who are unable to produce breastmilk.

When is the best time to begin building a freezer stash?

Like most things related to your baby and your body, the best time to begin building a freezer stash depends on how you feel. In general, it’s wise to wait until you’ve got the hang of breastfeeding and you’ve had time for bonding with your newborn. Trying to do too many new things at once, especially while you’re still physically and emotionally recovering from pregnancy and labor, can be defeating. Use your first several weeks to enjoy your baby and allow your body to rest and recuperate. Then, when you’re ready, integrate pumping into your routine.

If you know pumping at work will be difficult, consider starting about three weeks before you return to the job site to make sure you’ve got an ample supply. However, even in a restrictive work environment, moms are able to do more OTJ pumping with portable, wearable breast pumps like the Elvie Stride. That means you don’t have to have quite as much in storage as you can continue building the supply by pumping at work.

How much breastmilk should I store in my freezer?

Generally speaking, babies between two and five months consume between four and six ounces at each feeding, and they nurse every three to four hours, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Older babies may drink as much as eight ounces per session with fewer sessions altogether. Let’s imagine a two month old who drinks six ounces every four hours. For that thirsty baby, you’d need to have at least 12 ounces in storage to cover a single 8-hour workday.

However, as we mentioned above, this may vary by baby. There’s only one sure way to get a clear picture of how much your baby will require each day while you’re at work. Track their consumption first. You can try using a breastfeeding app to easily track feedings. We’ve reviewed a few Android and iPhone apps recently that you may want to consider. Some smart pumps, like the Stride, connect with an app that automatically tracks feedings, further simplifying the process. If you’re not sure whether your pump of choice comes with an app, ask us, and we’ll verify.

What are the best freezer containers for breastmilk storage?

Plenty of options for breastmilk storage exist, but we recommend breastmilk storage bags. They take up less room in the freezer, allowing you to build your supply without sacrificing valuable ice cream space. Be sure to choose bags designated for breastmilk storage as they are more durable and BPA-free.

How long will breastmilk last in the freezer?

As a rule, the fresher the milk, the more nutrients it contains. In addition, more recent milk contains antibodies for potential bugs floating around out there, so it’s good to use milk within a few weeks when possible. However, freshly expressed breastmilk can be stored in the back of the freezer for up to a year. Label breastmilk containers with the date the milk was expressed (and your child’s name if the bags will be stored at a childcare facility) and use the oldest milk first to get the most nutritional value out of each bag.

How do I thaw breastmilk?

You can either move the frozen container to the refrigerator on the evening before you plan to use it, or you can warm it up gently in a bowl of warm water or by running it under warm water from the faucet. Research suggests that rapid heating of breastmilk can impact its antibodies, so avoid microwaving it.

Need more information on integrating pumping into your breastfeeding schedule?

We’ve covered that in a recent blog post, so check it out! If you still have questions, give us a call. We’re all moms and breast pump pros at Milk N Mamas Baby, and we’re happy to help.

Mother is feeding newborn baby. A woman feeds a newborn with modified milk from a bottle.

Create the perfect pumping and breastfeeding schedule for you

Whether you’re returning to work or planning for a night out with the girls, pumping offers breastfeeding moms a little bit of freedom. That being said, you may feel some stress when you think about the logistics of it all. For example, how do you fit pumping into your already full schedule? Don’t worry, mama. We’ve got some ideas to help you seamlessly integrate pumping into your day.

Add pumping to your regular on demand breastfeeding schedule

If you’re able, continue to breastfeed your baby according to their usual schedule. For most babies, that’s about every two to three hours, though that may vary at different times of the day and as baby grows. To get the most out of those normal feeding sessions, pump the breast that baby is not nursing. That allows you to meet your newborn’s demands while also collecting milk for storage.

Use a newborn’s nursing schedule as your guide

If you’re unable to breastfeed on demand due to work, travel, latching difficulties, or other challenges, use your newborn’s nursing schedule to plan out your pumping sessions. As previously mentioned, that’s probably a pumping session every two to three hours during the early months. As baby grows (or if situations don’t allow for that frequency), every three to four hours will suffice.

Try cluster pumping

When they’re going through growth spurts, babies tend to “cluster pump.” That means that they nurse more frequently in shorter bursts. You can mimic this feeding style by breaking up a twenty-minute pumping session into three ten-minute pumping sessions with a five-minute break between each expression.

Add a morning pumping session

Many women tend to have fuller breasts in the morning, so try adding a session an hour before or after your baby’s morning nursing session. By the evening, most of us are tired and stressed, which inhibits the hormones that trigger the letdown effect, so adding an evening session is usually out of the question.

Recruit help and hold them to it

If you’ve got a partner in this thing called parenting, find ways to help them help you. Pumping does involve some assembly and maintenance, so ask your partner to take over that part so that you’re not solely responsible for the work involved in breastfeeding and pumping. Encourage your partner to take over some of the feeding sessions as well, using all that milk you’ve stored. You can add another pumping session while your partner cuddles and feeds baby.

Try a hands-free pumping bra to make sessions more productive

Okay, first, remember that you do not have to be productive all the time, mama. As a woman creating milk from her body, you’re doing work even when you’re doing nothing. However, we all know that even the most self-care-oriented mama often has a full to do list. A hands-free pumping bra paired with a lightweight, portable pump like the Evie or the BabyBuddha makes it a little easier to fit another pumping session into your schedule.

Find the right pump for your situation

A comfortable breast pump is critical to a successful pumping session. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

top tips for breastfeeding and pumping

Top 7 tips for combining breastfeeding and pumping

Pumping offers a number of benefits to breastfeeding mamas. Most nursing moms experience engorgement at some point. Pumping almost instantly relieves the pressure of engorged breasts. Worried about your breastmilk supply? Pumping stimulates milk production and allows you to store away milk for a future feeding – maybe even netting you a day at the spa (or work if that’s your thing). Pumping also allows your partner and other family members and caregivers to feed your little one, and you can even donate your extra milk to moms who aren’t able to breastfeed.

Use the following tips to help you make the most of your pumping sessions without interfering with those special skin-to-skin feedings.

#1 Breastfeed on demand when possible

Pumping will never replace the special bonding that happens when you nurse your baby, and on demand nursing actually boosts production during your pumping sessions. So go ahead and enjoy breastfeeding as your schedule allows.

#2 Pump frequently

Because breastmilk works by supply and demand, more pumping sessions means more breastmilk. Therefore, it’s a good idea to schedule 15─20 minute pumping sessions every three to four hours. Make the most of those sessions by double pumping.

#3 Avoid formula feedings

Formula is harder for infants to digest, which means it stays in their systems longer. That, in turn, means babies who are formula fed are hungry less frequently. Babies who aren’t hungry don’t breastfeed as often, and that interferes with the whole chain of supply and demand. In other words, the less your baby feeds, the less milk your body makes. If formula is a must, make sure to pump during formula feeding sessions to keep your milk supply up.

#4 Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Your breasts naturally produce breastmilk from water, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in your body. Therefore, less water in your body means less breastmilk when baby is hungry. Besides that, water is good for you, mama! Hydration is a struggle we all face, even when we’re not breastfeeding, but it’s especially important to hydrate when you’re drinking for two.

#5 Avoid dehydrating foods and drinks

Even if you drink an abundance of juice, milk, water, and other hydrating fluids, you’ll undo the good work if you’re also consuming foods and drinks that dehydrate you. High salt snacks and high sugar beverages are two culprits that contribute to dehydration. Meats also tend to dehydrate as do fried foods. And of course, alcohol, coffee, and tea can lead to dehydration, which may interfere with breastmilk production.

#6 Try meditation

Mindfulness meditation has been shown to increase relaxation, which can in turn boost breastmilk production by more than 60%! It also turns your pumping session into a self-care session, which will make you even more relaxed during those precious breastfeeding sessions.

#7 Choose your breast pump wisely

A comfortable breast pump is important to maintaining your pumping practice and will help to boost your milk supply. Conversely, an uncomfortable pump could cause you to throw in the towel early if the discomfort is too distracting. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

Breastfeeding moms need support from partners and other family members.

How can partners support breastfeeding moms?

It’s not uncommon for new parents to be nervous about all of the new responsibilities they’ll be taking on. The biological experience of pregnancy helps mothers to adjust to their new role. However, their partners may feel they’ve been dropped into the deep end when the baby arrives. It can be difficult to know how to help, and this is particularly common when mom is breastfeeding.

Some obstacles to partner support

After delivery, mom may be too tired to explain what she needs to her partner. She may not even be entirely sure what she needs. On the other hand, her partner may feel left out of the experience or even a little jealous. They might also feel powerless to do much to help or nervous about interfering with breastfeeding and mama-baby bonding.

Why supporting breastfeeding is important

Just like anyone doing something for the first time, a new mom needs support when she begins breastfeeding. It may seem that breastfeeding should come naturally. After all, women have been doing it for millennia. However, the truth is she’s probably just as nervous as her partner. She may also be worried that she’s doing something wrong. And let’s not forget that she’s tired. Really tired. Guaranteed.

But breast milk is the very best nourishment that a newborn can have. Nothing is more nutrient-rich or offers more health benefits – both long- and short-term – for babies. Breastfeeding is even good for mom, releasing feel good hormones like oxytocin and prolactin that help to reduce her stress levels and encourage faster recovery from childbirth. Plus, women who breastfeed have reduced rates of breast and ovarian cancer as well as other chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Breastfeeding also helps mom bond with her newborn, and it can enhance the social and emotional development of babies.

At the community level, no other form of nourishment is as sustainable as breastfeeding. It’s totally green, which benefits our environment, and healthier babies grow up to be healthier, happier, more productive community members.

How partners and other family members can help mom

Help around the house

Often, one person in a partnership is the cleaner upper. Usually, it’s the person who cares the most about a tidy, comfortable home. Unfortunately, that often tends to be the mom. When she’s breastfeeding, however, she may not have the energy to clean up. That doesn’t mean she doesn’t care or that a house gradually falling into disarray doesn’t bother her. One of the biggest ways a partner can help is by picking up the slack around the house.

Let mom sleep through the night

A good night’s sleep is critical to a recovering mom’s health, and her health is critical to her milk supply. Therefore, mama needs a good night’s sleep every once in a while. If she’s pumping, step in at night to feed the baby so that she can have the uninterrupted rest her body needs.

Be supportive of breastfeeding in public

As difficult as it is to understand, there’s still lingering controversy around breastfeeding in public. I have a mom friend in New Orleans whose mother-in-law nearly crawled under the bench in embarrassment when her daughter-in-law breastfed her hungry baby in a park. Fortunately, my friend’s husband pointed out to his mother that the worst that could happen in the Big Easy is someone throwing beads at the new mom. That’s how you support your partner when she’s breastfeeding.

Know your way around a breast pump

A breast pump can really level the playing field for parents when mom is breastfeeding. It means that she doesn’t have to be the only person feeding the baby in the middle of the night, for example. However, breast pumps are a little more work than breastfeeding. But for partners who enjoy a gadget to fiddle with, breast pump support can be the perfect job. Pumps and bottles need to be cleaned regularly, and pumps also need to be assembled after cleaning. If the pump and bottles are always at the ready for mom, her life is that much easier.

Get involved in breast pump logistics

Here’s an idea. When the mother-to-be is shopping for a breast pump, participate. Show as much interest as you might show in the search for a new computer or a new car. Breast pumps are pretty amazing machines, and they make it possible for partners to share more responsibility with breastfeeding. Take some time to read up on the best models and to learn how they work. We’ve got plenty of articles here to start with, and of course, our experts are on hand to answer all of your breast pump questions.

woman meditating with baby

Meditation, breastfeeding, and mindful mamas

Being a mom is often overwhelming. It’s not easy being responsible for a whole other human (even less so when you’re responsible for a few of them). Moms frequently feel lost in a brain fog. Even though breastfeeding is linked to that feel good hormone oxytocin, it’s not uncommon to feel “touched out” after a day of nursing. Mindfulness meditation is one way to re-center yourself on those challenging days. And it may be good for breastmilk production, too.

What is mindfulness meditation?

Mindfulness meditation is exactly what it sounds like – a practice that combines meditation and mindfulness. Meditation is a centuries old practice that has been used in nearly every culture and religion to encourage calm, centeredness, focus, and awareness. In its most basic form, it is sitting or lying comfortably and focusing on your breath, a mantra, or a specific object. However, writing in a journal, walking, and breastfeeding can all become a meditative practice if you are practicing mindfulness. Mindfulness is simply drawing your focus to the present moment and being fully involved in the experience of it.

The benefits of meditation for breastfeeding moms

Being a new mom can be a stressful time, especially when you’re juggling breastfeeding with work and other responsibilities. It’s not uncommon to feel exhausted and even depressed as a new mother. According to Mayo Clinic, meditation is a “simple, fast way to reduce stress” while cultivating inner peace. Research suggests that meditation helps to clear away information overload while offering a new perspective on stressful situations. It can reduce negative feelings while increasing patience. Research even suggests meditation may improve some medical conditions that are aggravated by stress, for example, anxiety, chronic pain, and tension headaches.

Meditation and breastmilk production

Notably, new research suggests that meditation may boost breastmilk production and even make pumping a more pleasant experience. How? The hormone oxytocin plays an important role in breastfeeding, as it triggers the let-down reflex and encourages mother-infant bonding. Studies show that stress hormones play a role in reducing milk production and inhibiting milk transfer by interfering with the production of oxytocin. According to one study, mindfulness meditation leads to the release of oxytocin in the brain, promoting a sense of well-being and stimulating bonding. More importantly to breastfeeding mothers, that release of oxytocin may stimulate breastmilk production.

Meditation while pumping for improved production

In another study, women who listened to a relaxation tape while pumping for twenty minutes a day had a 63% increase in milk production compared with the control group. Imagine that! Using your pumping session as an opportunity to meditate can boost your breastmilk production and improve your mood, your patience, and your stress levels.

How to practice mindfulness meditation while pumping

  1. GET COMFORTABLE. Find a cozy, quiet spot where you won’t be disturbed. (This is a good time to call on your partner to run interference and protect your peace.) Attach your breast pump (or pumps if you are double-pumping) and find your maximum comfortable vacuum.
  2. FOCUS ON YOUR BREATHING. Close your eyes and focus your attention on the rise and fall of your breath. Breathe in deeply, and when you release your breath, imagine stress and tension leaving your body.
  3. SCAN YOUR BODY. As you breathe in and out, scan your body from head to toe, noticing tension and letting it go. Keep breathing and allow your attention to your breathing to ground you if your mind begins to wander.
  4. BE KIND TO YOURSELF. You have many distractions in your life right now, many responsibilities, and your brain is likely to try to tiptoe back to those thoughts that cause you stress. That’s okay. Make a note of the thoughts and then gently bring your attention back to your breathing.
  5. REPEAT DAILY. For maximum rewards, repeat this practice at least twice a day for twenty minutes each.

A comfortable breast pump is important for this practice as it won’t distract you or cause discomfort. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

Shot of pretty young mother with her baby in sling drinking coffee while working with laptop at home.

How does caffeine affect breastfeeding?

Worried about breastfeeding while enjoying the sweet, sweet energy of caffeine?

Let’s face it, if you’re a new mom, you haven’t been getting much sleep lately. In fact, a 2019 survey conducted by Sleep Junkie found that only one in ten parents gets the recommended 7+ hours of head-to-pillow time.

We have questions.

First, who is this one parent sleeping through the night, and what kind of pixie dust are they using on their baby? Second, can the other nine of us give in to the siren call of coffee first thing in the morning, or are we doing damage to our breastfeeding babies if we just say no to that sweet, sweet caffeine?

Relax, a little caffeine isn’t likely to harm your newborn.

Like most things, caffeine in moderation is relatively harmless, even if you’re nursing. According to board-certified lactation consultant Nancy Mohrbacher’s book Breastfeeding Answers, nursing newborns only consume about 1.5% of the maternal dose of caffeine when breastfeeding. The National Library of Medicine Drugs and Lactation Database finds that having 2─3 cups (about 300─500 mg) of coffee per day to keep your eyes open and your brain chugging along despite sleep deprivation is A-okay. The same applies to other sources of caffeine, though it’s important to note that sodas and energy drinks, for instance, have other problematic chemicals to consider like sugars and taurine.

But don’t overdo your caffeine consumption.

Some research indicates that more than 450 mL of coffee per day can lead to a decrease in breastmilk iron concentrations. This can result in mild iron deficiency anemia in some breastfed infants. Further, fussiness, jitteriness, and poor sleep patterns have been reported in infants of mothers who drink 10 or more cups of coffee daily. (For that matter, the mothers were probably feeling pretty jittery, too.)

When should nursing mothers avoid caffeine?

Some babies are more likely than others to respond negatively to caffeine. For example, breastfed infants three weeks and older showed no sign of stimulation even after their mothers had five cups of coffee. However, preterm and younger newborn infants metabolize caffeine more slowly. That means they may be more vulnerable to the side effects of caffeine like irritability and sleeplessness. Likewise, babies with other health issues may also be more vulnerable to caffeine, so consult with your physician before you start brewing that pot of black gold.

In the end, you’re most familiar with your baby’s normal temperament. If you see signs of unusual fussiness or wakefulness after you’ve had a few cups of coffee or soda, consider going caffeine-free for a couple of weeks to see if baby settles back down.

Consider pumping when your breastmilk is caffeine free to be on the safe side.

If you still don’t feel good about drinking caffeine while breastfeeding, you could always use your trusty breast pump to express milk when you’re caffeine-free. Caffeine levels peak in breastmilk one to two hours after consumption, so plan your pumping schedule accordingly.

You’ll sleep again.

Whether to coffee or not to coffee is ultimately your decision, mama. But one way or another, you will get a good night’s sleep again some day, and the coffee pot will be there waiting whenever you’re ready for it.

breastfeeding mom holding infant and using app on phone

3 free breastfeeding apps that can help overhwhelmed moms

Breastfeeding: there’s an app for that!

There really is an app for everything – breastfeeding included! Don’t believe it? Take a look at these three apps that nursing moms swear by!

Baby Feeding Log for iPads

Baby Feeding Log is a free, pared down breastfeeding tracker that can help overwhelmed moms keep up with feedings, sleep schedules, and diaper changes. You can even keep track of what breast you pumped from last!

Reviewer Chella says, “Exactly what I needed and nothing more. This app is just what I was looking for. A lot of other trackers are overly complex and too sophisticated. This one keeps it simple and is very easy to use. I especially appreciate the pause feature, as I usually do a diaper change in the middle of nursing to wake up my baby. I do, however, wish it had an option to add notes to a feed. Sometimes my baby is drowsy and doesn’t eat as vigorously as other times and I wish I could note this. I also could use this feature to note when medicine or vitamins are given.”

Get it at the Apple App Store.

Breastfeeding Tracker for Androids

We love this free app because, like Milk N Mamas Baby, it’s made by a mom for other moms! This Android-friendly app allows you to track breastfeeding, complementary feeding, sleeps, crying, weight, height and head circumference, pumping times, temperature and even arbitrary self-defined events like nappies or fever. Even better – you can sync with your partner, nanny, or grandparents to share vital information.

Reviewer Katie Garretson says, “After my second child was born, I was just plain tired and didn’t feel like I had the mental space to track feeding/diapers/everything else by hand like I did for my first child. This app has been worth every penny I paid. I went ahead and paid for all of the features, and I’ve used most of them already. I like that everything is editable, and that it tracks how long since the last feed from the beginning of the feed, which is what my midwives and lactation consultants said to do.”

Get it at Google Play.

Baby Daybook for Androids and iPhones

This free app has a few more bells and whistles than the previous two apps, including food logging, potty training, and health tracking, a timeline of your child’s day and a photo album, to name a few.

Reviewer Elliot Rivers says, “This app is awesome. I never rate anything but felt moved to rate this one for how much it has helped us keep track of the complexities of newborn-dom. We track everything in here. The Google Assistant integration, though, is the clear standout feature; logging data is hands free. (Even works with custom Google Home routines).”

Get it at Google Play or the Apple App Store.

woman breastfeeding baby on a beach

World Breastfeeding Week 2021: a celebration of the benefits of breastfeeding

World Breastfeeding Week is celebrated each year from August 1 to August 7 in more than 120 countries. This year, the theme is “Protect Breastfeeding: a shared responsibility.”

Obviously, breastfeeding is a responsibility that should be shared within a family. While fathers may not be able to produce breastmilk, they can certainly help mothers by providing support, taking on other responsibilities that usually fall on the mother, and even feeding baby with a bottle at night so mom can get much needed sleep.

However, I think the World Health Organization and the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund, the original founders of the annual celebration, may have had something bigger in mind. After all, breastfeeding isn’t just good for moms and babies. It’s good for society. Breastfed babies are healthier and have fewer medical problems, which reduces healthcare strain on communities.

That means that everyone should get behind moms who are breastfeeding. I’d like to see more local organizations that support breastfeeding, like farmer’s markets that offer coupons for breastfeeding and partially-breastfeeding women to ensure a healthy diet. I’d like to see more corporate efforts to protect this important service that mothers provide, like Target, whose breastfeeding policy received praise after it was recently posted on Facebook.

Being a mom under any conditions is both rewarding and exhausting. Likewise, breastfeeding has too many benefits for everyone to count, but it does take a toll on moms, who can feel “touched out” after a day of nursing. This week, pay special attention to the breastfeeding moms in your life and let them know you’re proud of them. Offer to lend a hand if you’ve got the time.

And if you’re the breastfeeding mom, I want you to know that I’m proud of you. Keep up the labor of love. You’re not just improving the health of your own child – you’re improving the health of your family, your community, and the world.

expectant mom eating healthy in preparation for breastfeeding

How do I prepare myself for breastfeeding?

The ups and downs of breastfeeding

Breast milk contains all the essential nutrients your baby needs to develop. It’s a natural immune booster for newborns, and it reduces the risk of many lifelong illnesses. It even helps new moms lose some of the weight they put on while pregnant and triggers the happy hormone oxytocin that helps both mom and baby relax.

But it’s not always easy. Some days you’ll be tired and “touched out” from so much contact with baby, as described by Amanda Barnhardt in our interview with the military mom. Some days your little one will be colicky and even the soothing balm of breastmilk won’t ease the crying. On those days, it’s good to be prepared. So how do you prepare for breastfeeding?

Assemble your breastfeeding support team

Feeling supported during your time breastfeeding will increase your chances of success. A knowledgeable team will help you mentally prepare for the experience while also helping you respond appropriately to challenges you may face. While your breastfeeding experience will be entirely unique, it can help to know that you won’t be alone in your experience. Lots of us have been there, and we can help show you the ropes and support you throughout your time nursing.

Who should you include in your team? Recruit your doctor and your baby’s pediatrician as well as a lactation consultant if possible. Enlist friends who have breastfed or make new friends via local breastfeeding or parent groups. You can even give the consultants at Milk N Mamas Baby a call or email if you need a sounding board.

Become a breastfeeding expert in your own right

If you can find a breastfeeding class in your community, sign up. Not only will you get some in-person time with lactation consultants who can offer valuable information on what to expect, you’ll also have an opportunity to meet other breastfeeding moms. However, if there aren’t IRL classes, you can learn plenty online from sources like Medela’s Breastfeeding University or the Learning to Breastfeed Library at the website for the Office of Women’s Health. Books like La Leche League International’s The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding and Breastfeeding with Confidence by International Lactation Consultant Association President Sue Cox can also offer insight and encouragement. The more you know about breastfeeding, the more confident you’ll be, and that’s half the battle.

Get the breast pump equipment you need ahead of time

Deciding on the right breast pump for your situation will also take a little time and research. Do you want manual or electric? Is portability important? What sort of suction are you looking for in a pump? How often will you use it? If you’ve got insurance, you’ll need to find out if the pump you prefer is covered. Fortunately, you’ve already got some support in this area. We’re more than happy to talk you through your decision and help you choose a pump that’s just right for your circumstances. Just give us a call at 1-888-606-8425 or email us at [email protected].

two happy babies swaddled in towels after a bath

What are the benefits of co-bathing?

Taking a bath with baby can be a soothing experience

If you find that bathing your newborn in an infant tub leads to tears and squalling, consider co-bathing as an alternative. Infant tubs only hold a small amount of water, and baby is only partially submerged. That makes bathtime a chilly experience for a little one. Conversely, co-bathing offers baby skin-to-skin contact that leaves her feeling peaceful and cozy.

How do you co-bathe safely?

  1. Fill your clean bathtub with water that matches your body temperature. This ensures baby will be right at home – neither too hot nor too cold.
  2. Have your partner deliver baby to you once you’re settled in the tub. It’s best not to try this alone as tubs can be slippery. Likewise, deliver baby back to your partner after bathing for everyone’s safety.
  3. Allow baby to float with your hand securely behind her head. This will remind her of her time in the womb. You may be surprised how much she enjoys it!
  4. Don’t bathe too frequently or too long. Baby only needs about three baths each week, aside from bird baths to keep her face and tooshy fresh. More bathing or soaking too long can actually harm baby’s sensitive skin.
  5. Avoid soap. For the same reason, it’s best to use plain old water when you’re bathing a newborn. After a few weeks or months, you may choose to use a sensitive skin soap made for little ones.
  6. Use bath time to nurse baby. Warm water will help breastmilk flow, and it will relax both mom and baby. That means co-bathing is an ideal opportunity for nursing. Give it a try if you’ve been having trouble getting baby to latch or if you’ve been concerned about your breastmilk production.

What are the benefits of co-bathing?

First of all, you’ll probably make baby very happy. Warm water and the feel of mommy nearby is a treat for infants. In addition, skin-to-skin contact helps to create a bond between mom and baby, and it can also stimulate breastmilk flow. It’s not often mommy gets time for a warm bath, so co-bathing can also be considered self-care for tired mothers.