breast feeding Tag

The pumpkin spice news breastfeeding moms have been waiting for

Autumn is officially here, and that means it’s pumpkin spice season. While motherhood often means sacrificing things you love (like that tenth cup of coffee if you’re breastfeeding), one thing you don’t have to sacrifice this October is the flavor of fall. We all suspected there was magic in pumpkin spice, and it turns out, we weren’t wrong.

Pumpkin boosts breastmilk production

“Galactagogue” is one of our favorite words around here, and not just because it’s fun to say and sounds like a comic book villain. According to the National Institute for Health, “Galactagogues are synthetic or plant molecules used to induce, maintain, and increase milk production.” We’ve covered a few of them in past blog posts, and The Great Pumpkin falls into that celebrated food group, too.

How pumpkins benefit breastmilk

  • Pumpkins have antioxidant and antibacterial agents that improve the immune system of moms and babies.
  • The bright orange glow of a pumpkin marks it as a food rich in health-boosting nutrients like beta-carotene, vitamin A, and potassium, and it’s a low calorie source of fiber.
  • Studies show that eating pumpkin and other galactagogues is significantly correlated to increased milk volume.

But it’s not just pumpkin that’s good for milk production…the spices are, too!

That’s right! Cinnamon is a traditional herbal treatment to enhance milk production. Cinnamon falls into a class of plants called “nervine herbs,” which means herbs that help reduce anxiety. As we’ve mentioned in previous articles, stress can impact milk production, so add a little cinnamon to your pumpkin to ease stress-causing anxiety.

Like cinnamon, ginger has a long history with breastfeeding moms. It many areas, it’s still given to women after childbirth to stimulate milk production. Research is underway, but at least one study has already returned some promising results, so throw a pinch of ginger in that pie!

Happy pumpkin spice season, mamas!

It was a long summer, and I think most of us are good and ready for fall. It’s time to rest and recuperate. Go ahead and enjoy a little hibernation, mama bear, and indulge in that pumpkin spice magic. You deserve it.

If you’re headed out and about to the coffee shop for your favorite fall brew, you’ll need a fashionable bag, and we think this Sarah Wells version is perfect for the fall! Pick yours up today while you’re here.beautiful breast pump bag for fall

 

breastfeeding mom holding infant and using app on phone

3 free breastfeeding apps that can help overhwhelmed moms

Breastfeeding: there’s an app for that!

There really is an app for everything – breastfeeding included! Don’t believe it? Take a look at these three apps that nursing moms swear by!

Baby Feeding Log for iPads

Baby Feeding Log is a free, pared down breastfeeding tracker that can help overwhelmed moms keep up with feedings, sleep schedules, and diaper changes. You can even keep track of what breast you pumped from last!

Reviewer Chella says, “Exactly what I needed and nothing more. This app is just what I was looking for. A lot of other trackers are overly complex and too sophisticated. This one keeps it simple and is very easy to use. I especially appreciate the pause feature, as I usually do a diaper change in the middle of nursing to wake up my baby. I do, however, wish it had an option to add notes to a feed. Sometimes my baby is drowsy and doesn’t eat as vigorously as other times and I wish I could note this. I also could use this feature to note when medicine or vitamins are given.”

Get it at the Apple App Store.

Breastfeeding Tracker for Androids

We love this free app because, like Milk N Mamas Baby, it’s made by a mom for other moms! This Android-friendly app allows you to track breastfeeding, complementary feeding, sleeps, crying, weight, height and head circumference, pumping times, temperature and even arbitrary self-defined events like nappies or fever. Even better – you can sync with your partner, nanny, or grandparents to share vital information.

Reviewer Katie Garretson says, “After my second child was born, I was just plain tired and didn’t feel like I had the mental space to track feeding/diapers/everything else by hand like I did for my first child. This app has been worth every penny I paid. I went ahead and paid for all of the features, and I’ve used most of them already. I like that everything is editable, and that it tracks how long since the last feed from the beginning of the feed, which is what my midwives and lactation consultants said to do.”

Get it at Google Play.

Baby Daybook for Androids and iPhones

This free app has a few more bells and whistles than the previous two apps, including food logging, potty training, and health tracking, a timeline of your child’s day and a photo album, to name a few.

Reviewer Elliot Rivers says, “This app is awesome. I never rate anything but felt moved to rate this one for how much it has helped us keep track of the complexities of newborn-dom. We track everything in here. The Google Assistant integration, though, is the clear standout feature; logging data is hands free. (Even works with custom Google Home routines).”

Get it at Google Play or the Apple App Store.

expectant mom eating healthy in preparation for breastfeeding

How do I prepare myself for breastfeeding?

The ups and downs of breastfeeding

Breast milk contains all the essential nutrients your baby needs to develop. It’s a natural immune booster for newborns, and it reduces the risk of many lifelong illnesses. It even helps new moms lose some of the weight they put on while pregnant and triggers the happy hormone oxytocin that helps both mom and baby relax.

But it’s not always easy. Some days you’ll be tired and “touched out” from so much contact with baby, as described by Amanda Barnhardt in our interview with the military mom. Some days your little one will be colicky and even the soothing balm of breastmilk won’t ease the crying. On those days, it’s good to be prepared. So how do you prepare for breastfeeding?

Assemble your breastfeeding support team

Feeling supported during your time breastfeeding will increase your chances of success. A knowledgeable team will help you mentally prepare for the experience while also helping you respond appropriately to challenges you may face. While your breastfeeding experience will be entirely unique, it can help to know that you won’t be alone in your experience. Lots of us have been there, and we can help show you the ropes and support you throughout your time nursing.

Who should you include in your team? Recruit your doctor and your baby’s pediatrician as well as a lactation consultant if possible. Enlist friends who have breastfed or make new friends via local breastfeeding or parent groups. You can even give the consultants at Milk N Mamas Baby a call or email if you need a sounding board.

Become a breastfeeding expert in your own right

If you can find a breastfeeding class in your community, sign up. Not only will you get some in-person time with lactation consultants who can offer valuable information on what to expect, you’ll also have an opportunity to meet other breastfeeding moms. However, if there aren’t IRL classes, you can learn plenty online from sources like Medela’s Breastfeeding University or the Learning to Breastfeed Library at the website for the Office of Women’s Health. Books like La Leche League International’s The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding and Breastfeeding with Confidence by International Lactation Consultant Association President Sue Cox can also offer insight and encouragement. The more you know about breastfeeding, the more confident you’ll be, and that’s half the battle.

Get the breast pump equipment you need ahead of time

Deciding on the right breast pump for your situation will also take a little time and research. Do you want manual or electric? Is portability important? What sort of suction are you looking for in a pump? How often will you use it? If you’ve got insurance, you’ll need to find out if the pump you prefer is covered. Fortunately, you’ve already got some support in this area. We’re more than happy to talk you through your decision and help you choose a pump that’s just right for your circumstances. Just give us a call at 1-888-606-8425 or email us at [email protected].

Is it safe to use marijuana while breastfeeding?

How legalizing cannabis changes our view of it

After years of debate, the U.S. House passed a bill to legalize marijuana at the federal level in 2020. It looks as if prospects for the federal decriminalization of marijuana may be just around the corner. For many Americans, this is a welcome change as medical marijuana has many benefits with few side effects. This may send the message that cannabis is safe to use while breastfeeding. However, evidence has shown that marijuana use can be harmful to nursing babies.

How does weed affect breastmilk?

Marijuana has more than 400 chemicals, including cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinal (THC), the plant’s main pychoactive component. When a breastfeeding mother uses cannabis, some of the chemicals get into her milk supply. According to a study conducted in 2018, more than 6 in 10 women who used weed had detectable levels of THC in their breastmilk samples up to six days after their last use. Another study found that it could stay in a woman’s system for as long as six weeks.

This is likely due to the fact that breastmilk is highly fatty, and both THC and CBD bind heavily to fats. While alcohol is dispensed from breastmilk at the same rate it leaves the blood, the chemicals found in marijuana tend to build up in breastmilk. In fact, the same report found that a mother could have eight times as much THC in her milk as in her blood.

How do THC and CBD affect newborns?

Very little human research has been conducted in recent years, so it’s hard to say with 100% certainty how THC and CBD affect newborns. A study of suckling mice exposed to cannabis extract showed decreased weight gain. A study of rats exposed to THC in utero found that exposure leads to lasting neurodevelopmental impairment. What these mean for human babies is hard to say.

However, THC does inhibit the production of prolactin, the hormone that controls milk production. Further, some studies have shown that babies exposed to THC may not nurse as long or as vigorously.

What does the CDC say about using marijuana while breastfeeding?

While data is currently limited on the effects of marijuana use while breastfeeding, the CDC provides the following guidance:

Data on the effects of marijuana and CBD exposure to the infant through breastfeeding are limited and conflicting. To limit potential risk to the infant, breastfeeding mothers should be advised not to use marijuana or marijuana-containing products in any form, including those containing CBD, while breastfeeding.

Talk to your doctor about using marijuana while breastfeeding

If you’ve been using marijuana medicinally, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor about how to proceed while you’re breastfeeding. They will be able to advise you on possible alternatives or best use scenarios.

online breast feeding supplies

Top Reasons to Breastfeed

When you’ve got a baby on the way, you probably have a million questions. It’s only natural to jump on the internet and do a little (or a lot of) research. When it comes to breastfeeding, you can find plenty of different information out there, so who should you trust? Here at Milk N Mamas Baby, we think it’s important for moms to get good information about breastfeeding; that’s why today, we’d like to share some facts straight from the American Academy of Pediatrics about the top reasons why breastfeeding is good for babies.

  • Babies who are breastfed for at least 6 months are less likely to be overweight and have a reduced risk for childhood obesity.
  • A 40% reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been reported in those who were breastfed as babies.
  • Breastfeeding imparts a long-term positive effect on weight control and feeding self-regulation which is carried into adulthood.

In addition, The University of South Carolina reports the following benefits to breastfeeding:

  • Breast milk is more easily digestible for babies than formula.
  • Breastfeeding reduces the mother’s risk of developing breast cancer.
  • Breastfeeding helps develop and strengthen a baby’s immune system and can reduce a baby’s risk of developing allergies later in life.
  • Mother and baby are able to bond more effectively during breastfeeding, and it improves the mother’s self-confidence.
  • Nursing helps mom lose weight after pregnancy.
  • Breastfeeding costs less than buying formula.
  • Drinking breast milk can help a baby sleep better (which means more sleep for mom as well).
  • Breastfeeding aids in proper development of a baby’s gastrointestinal tract and may make them less likely to develop intestinal disorders like Ulcerative Colitis.

Of course, these are just a few of the many benefits of breastfeeding, so if you’d like to know more, be sure to talk to your doctor about whether or not breastfeeding is right for you and your baby. And if you’re in need of breastfeeding supplies like a hands free breast pump, take a look at the tabs on our page which contain information about our stock of baby breast pumps, respiratory devices, and more. You can even order a breast pump online and in most cases, totally free of charge, through your health insurance.

At Milk N Mamas Baby, we carry all the latest breast pumps, including the Medela and Spectra lines of breast pumps. These pumps are engineered with lots of mom-friendly features that will make your breastfeeding journey easier and more comfortable for you. They’re also portable, light weight, and can be powered with adaptive batteries, internal batteries, AC adapter, or even the optional car adapter, which is perfect for busy moms on the go. If you’d like to be hands free when pumping we have plenty of options for you! Why wait, head over to our convenient insurance signup form and begin your order process today. We are here to streamline the entire order process for you! We confirm your insurance coverage, assist you in obtaining a prescription from your healthcare provider and make sure you get your insurance covered breast pump prior to the arrival of your new baby.