Breast Pumping

Mother holding cute baby in bandana

The Best Breast Pump Brands of 2021

Breastfeeding is a natural part of raising babies, but it doesn’t have to suck. While some mothers decide to exclusively breastfeed, others may breastfeed only occasionally or not at all, in which case they’ll need to rely on pumping to build up stores of breast milk for each feeding. That’s better than relying on formula to feed your child the nutrients they need, and a breast pump allows you to meet the needs of your growing child.

If you’re a mother that doesn’t have the time during the day to breastfeed your child, especially if they spend the day with a caretaker, a breast pump makes feeding easy because anyone can step in while you take care of whatever else you’ve got going on. A breast pump can also give you flexibility during nighttime feedings or in the afternoon if you’re unavailable for a feeding, and they can also relieve engorgement when you’re out and about.

Best Breast Pump Brands – Types

While just about any breast pump can relieve pressure and help you build up your child’s personal store of mother’s milk, pumping in 2020 has come a long way from the contraptions that have been used in years past. In general, the best breast pump brand will have many options and models for you to choose from. After all, not all breast pumping needs are singular, and sometimes one breast pump works best in a certain scenario that would be wholly inappropriate for another.

Types of breast pumps include double-electric breast pumps, single-electric breast pumps, battery-operated breast pumps and manual breast pumps, though the one that’s best for you depends on your precise need. The best double breast pump allows you to pump both breasts at the same time, allowing you to get more milk out of your pumping sessions, while the best electric breast pump may be a bad call if you’re commuting or you don’t have access to an electrical outlet. Even a manual pump may be the best option for you if price and weight is an important consideration.

Best Breast Pump Brands – Closed or Open?

After choosing a type, the next consideration is whether you want a closed-system pump or an open-system pump. Closed-system pumps separate the milk from the machine via a barrier, while open-system pumps lack this barrier, sending milk throughout the system and into the bottle. Closed systems tend to be more hygienic and easier to clean and sterilize, though they also tend to be more expensive.

Best Breast Pump Brands – What To Look For

While 2020 certainly has no shortage of breast pump options, the best breast pump brand for you depends on your specific needs. Weight, noise, access to an outlet, hands-free operation and cost are all important considerations, and just one is enough to make what looked like a good option a no-go if one of your important criteria aren’t met.

The good news is that breast pumps are often covered by insurance, so cost is manageable to a certain extent. That said, you may need an extra pump at the office or in the car, so if you’re buying your second or third pump, cost may be an important consideration.

The Best Breast Pumps

Forget about specific brands, here are the best breast pumps for various uses:

The best breast pump for working moms is the Motif Luna Battery Powered Breast Pump.

The best portable or battery-powered pump is the BabyBuddha Complete Kit.
For more breast pump suggestions, please visit our breast pump page.

Mother holding child

Does Insurance Cover Breast Pumps? An Overview

Breastfeeding is a wonderful, healthy, and bonding way to nourish your newborn, and some mothers will extend the period of breastfeeding well into infanthood. That’s mostly because of the enormous health benefits that breastfeeding provides that simply cannot be replicated with any formula, but in many cases, it’s also a wise economical decision given that synthetic formula can be quite expensive, especially over time. However, that doesn’t mean that breastfeeding is free, as there are costs involved relating to equipment. 

The central component of breastfeeding, at least as your child gets a bit older and you want to get ahead of things a bit, is the breast pump. Breast pumps can carry a bit of a cost, but a lot of new mothers out there are likely asking themselves, “Does insurance cover breast pumps?” There are several possible answers to this question, but Milk n Mamas Baby will work through this situation below by way of some recommendations of how you should proceed to find your answer.

Work Ahead

If you’re expecting and you plan on breastfeeding, it’s best to check with your insurance company before the child arrives to find out what you need to know about your coverage. Yes, this only adds to an already-long list of things to do, but the last thing you want to deal with when caring for an infant is haggling and working through red tape. Instead, contact your insurance company to find out:

  1. What types of breast pumps are covered, if any;
  2. How long breast pumps are covered;
  3. How the ordering and claim process works; and
  4. When you should make that order.

Unfortunately, dealing directly with your insurance company may not lead to the result you desire quickly, so you may need to keep digging and working

Work With a Renowned Equipment Provider

If you’d like to avoid all of this red tape as you look for your answer to the question of whether or not insurance covers breast pumps, you can work directly with a nursing equipment provider who deals with this sort of thing every day. One such provider is, of course, Milk n Mamas Baby. We provide only the best breast pumps that the market has to offer, and we work not only with insurance companies, but also with expecting and new Moms to make sure that they get the breast pumps and other equipment they need to provide their little ones with their much needed and vital nutrition. 

The answer to the question, “Does insurance cover breast pumps?” is actually a simple yes in most situations, but getting to that yes can take some work. If you have it in you to deal with insurance bureaucracy and achieve the desired result on your own, take the step recommended above. If you don’t, then all you need to do is contact Milk n Mamas Baby and we’ll take care of this process for you so you don’t have to worry. Go ahead and take a look at our product offerings, but if you have any questions about our breast pumps, how to have them covered or any of our other products or services, feel free to contact us at any time.

Can I Drink a Glass of Wine While Breastfeeding?

While there are plenty of things for new moms to worry about, having a glass of wine with dinner shouldn’t be one of them. It’s true that drinking while pregnant is a no-no, but the same doesn’t hold true for breastfeeding moms. When you’re pregnant, any alcohol in your blood passes directly through the placenta to the fetus. However, when you’re nursing, your baby’s metabolism dilutes the alcohol in your blood. 

How to identify your milk alcohol level

When you have an alcoholic beverage, the level of alcohol in your blood is the same as the level of alcohol in your milk. A 140-pound woman who drinks three ounces (two glasses) of wine with 13% alcohol content will have a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of 0.006%. Likewise, her breastmilk will be 0.006% alcohol. The effects of the alcohol will peak about 30 to 60 minutes after consumption, and then the alcohol will pass out of the mother’s system.

Interestingly, some studies indicate that lactation lowers peak blood alcohol concentration. Breastfeeding moms get significantly less intoxicated than formula-feeding moms and other women when they drink the same amount. 

What happens if I nurse my baby after drinking a glass of wine?

One glass of wine is unlikely to have any notable effect on a healthy newborn. According to La Leche League, maternal blood alcohol levels must reach 300mg/100ml before significant side effects are reported in infant. To put that in perspective, you would be well past losing consciousness at this point. In fact, a review of 41 studies in the journal Basic + Clinical Pharmacology + Toxicology found that “even in a theoretical case of binge drinking, the children would not be subjected to clinically relevant amounts of alcohol [in the breastmilk].” 

However, some studies do seem to indicate that newborns take less milk than they would otherwise in the 3-4 hours after an alcoholic beverage is consumed. As the alcohol exits the mother’s system, newborns will increase their intake to make up for this decrease. It’s believed that the odor of the milk is off-putting to infants. In other words, it doesn’t taste quite right, but it’s harmless. 

Should I pump and dump?

Sometimes mothers are advised to “pump and dump” to clear the alcohol out of their systems. This actually has no effect. As long as there’s alcohol in your blood, there’s alcohol in your breastmilk. If you’re not comfortable breastfeeding your baby while there’s alcohol in your system, it’s just a matter of waiting 3-4 hours after you indulge to nurse again. That allows plenty of time for the wine to pass out of your system. 

A note on excessive drinking while breastfeeding

While the occasional glass of wine or beer is perfectly fine for breastfeeding moms, excessive alcohol can create problems for newborns. Large quantities of alcohol can cause weakness, drowsiness, deep sleep, and abnormal weight gain in infants, and excessive drinking can lead to failure to thrive. A breastfeeding mother who drinks to excess regularly can impede her baby’s growth, and she compromises her ability to care for her child. 

Raise your your glass, mama!

Not only is a little alcohol permissible, it’s productive. According to Mayo Clinic, moderate alcohol use can reduce your risk of developing heart disease and even your risk of diabetes. So relax, mom. Whether you want to indulge with a glass of wine at dinner or a beer on the beach, enjoy! 

Breast Pumping at Work

Tackling Breast Pumping at Work Like a Boss

Is your last day of maternity leave rapidly approaching and you have no idea how you’re going to tolerate pumping breast milk at work? Rest assured, mama — you’re not alone. Every working mom dedicated to feeding her child breast milk has walked in your shoes.

We’ll give you some tips to help ease your transition as you go back to work so your baby can continue to benefit from that liquid gold.

Know What You’re Entitled To

Not every boss is going to bend over backward to make sure you have everything you’re entitled to by law when you’re pumping at work. You may find yourself having to ask and fight for things your boss should provide you with. Stay fierce —your baby is counting on you for its nutritional needs and that’s far more important than playing nice at the workplace.

Create a Checklist

Maternity leave goes by shockingly fast. Before you know it, you’ll have to be headed back to your job. The time to plan, though, is before that happens.

A month before you return to work, make a checklist of items that have to be addressed before you go back. You’ll want to start a freezer stash of breast milk and discuss with your boss where and when you’ll be pumping at the workplace.

Closer to the date, you should ensure you have all the equipment you’ll need for pumping in a convenient bag you can carry to work.

Choose Your Pump Carefully

Before heading to the workplace, give careful thought about the kind of pump you want to buy. It should be portable, operate at more than one speed, be double electric so you can pump both breasts at once, not be too loud, and operate on a battery or power cord.

Write Out a Pumping Schedule

You can try to wing it instead of having a written plan in place. But you’ll likely find it easier to commit to a pumping schedule when it is in writing. It’s too easy to accidentally skip or push back pumping sessions if your schedule isn’t written down.

You don’t want to forget to pump for too long or you’ll face the possibility of engorgement, clogged milk ducts, and diminished milk supply. You should try to pump, even at work, around every three hours.

Try to Relax

Relaxing isn’t easy to do at work during normal circumstances. But when you add a pump, naked breasts, and potentially weird coworkers, it can get even harder to relax.

If you find yourself given a place to pump where you don’t feel comfortable, getting that let-down reflex can be a real problem. To help solve this issue, play some relaxing music on low while pumping or carry around a picture of your baby or one of their onesies that has that precious baby smell on it.

Take Some Shortcuts

Pumping at work can take up a good chunk of your workday, so you’re probably eager to not waste any more time than you have to. That’s why shortcuts can come in handy. Here’s one of our favorites for pumping breast milk at home or at work.

You don’t have to fully wash your breast pump after each use. When you’re at work, simply rinse it with hot water and put the removable pump parts that come in contact with breast milk in a large Ziploc bag, zip it up, and put it in the refrigerator. Then when you need it again in three hours, take it out and pump again.

You should always wash it at the end of the day though — you don’t want old milk on the pump the next day.

Be Ready for a Bumpy Ride

It doesn’t matter how ready you think you are for pumping while at work, you’re going to experience some hiccups. Maybe you’ll miss your baby far more than you anticipated while you’re at work or it won’t be as easy as you thought to carve out enough pumping time during your workday.

When the road gets tough, remind yourself that it’s worth every step. And if you can make it through the first week or two, you’ll start to fall into a routine and it will seem much easier.