Breast Pumping

Should I build a breastmilk freezer stash?

A breastmilk freezer stash serves an obvious purpose if you’re planning to return to work soon. However, a stash can be useful for any mom, including stay-at-home moms. Why? A freezer stash provides you with freedom if you want a night out on the town or if an unexpected emergency calls you away from your little one. It’s also a fail-safe if you have any other unanticipated breastfeeding interruption. If you’re using pumping to boost your milk supply, a freezer stash makes the best use of those extra pumping sessions. Some super-producers even donate a portion of their stash to moms who are unable to produce breastmilk.

When is the best time to begin building a freezer stash?

Like most things related to your baby and your body, the best time to begin building a freezer stash depends on how you feel. In general, it’s wise to wait until you’ve got the hang of breastfeeding and you’ve had time for bonding with your newborn. Trying to do too many new things at once, especially while you’re still physically and emotionally recovering from pregnancy and labor, can be defeating. Use your first several weeks to enjoy your baby and allow your body to rest and recuperate. Then, when you’re ready, integrate pumping into your routine.

If you know pumping at work will be difficult, consider starting about three weeks before you return to the job site to make sure you’ve got an ample supply. However, even in a restrictive work environment, moms are able to do more OTJ pumping with portable, wearable breast pumps like the Elvie Stride. That means you don’t have to have quite as much in storage as you can continue building the supply by pumping at work.

How much breastmilk should I store in my freezer?

Generally speaking, babies between two and five months consume between four and six ounces at each feeding, and they nurse every three to four hours, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Older babies may drink as much as eight ounces per session with fewer sessions altogether. Let’s imagine a two month old who drinks six ounces every four hours. For that thirsty baby, you’d need to have at least 12 ounces in storage to cover a single 8-hour workday.

However, as we mentioned above, this may vary by baby. There’s only one sure way to get a clear picture of how much your baby will require each day while you’re at work. Track their consumption first. You can try using a breastfeeding app to easily track feedings. We’ve reviewed a few Android and iPhone apps recently that you may want to consider. Some smart pumps, like the Stride, connect with an app that automatically tracks feedings, further simplifying the process. If you’re not sure whether your pump of choice comes with an app, ask us, and we’ll verify.

What are the best freezer containers for breastmilk storage?

Plenty of options for breastmilk storage exist, but we recommend breastmilk storage bags. They take up less room in the freezer, allowing you to build your supply without sacrificing valuable ice cream space. Be sure to choose bags designated for breastmilk storage as they are more durable and BPA-free.

How long will breastmilk last in the freezer?

As a rule, the fresher the milk, the more nutrients it contains. In addition, more recent milk contains antibodies for potential bugs floating around out there, so it’s good to use milk within a few weeks when possible. However, freshly expressed breastmilk can be stored in the back of the freezer for up to a year. Label breastmilk containers with the date the milk was expressed (and your child’s name if the bags will be stored at a childcare facility) and use the oldest milk first to get the most nutritional value out of each bag.

How do I thaw breastmilk?

You can either move the frozen container to the refrigerator on the evening before you plan to use it, or you can warm it up gently in a bowl of warm water or by running it under warm water from the faucet. Research suggests that rapid heating of breastmilk can impact its antibodies, so avoid microwaving it.

Need more information on integrating pumping into your breastfeeding schedule?

We’ve covered that in a recent blog post, so check it out! If you still have questions, give us a call. We’re all moms and breast pump pros at Milk N Mamas Baby, and we’re happy to help.

Elvie Stride, the ultra-quiet, hands-free breast pump! 

Why does every mom want an Elvie breast pump?

According to their Company Page, Elvie’s mission is “to improve women’s lives through smarter technology,” and the Elvie Pump has the potential to do just that. This wearable breast pump is so sleek it can fit into your bra. It’s silent, and it comes without tubes or wires, making it totally discreet. Based on a quick scan of @elvie mentions on Instagram, Elvie-wearing mamas are pumping on the beach, at the airport, on ski slopes, hiking in national parks, at the gym─even in bars. This innovative pump does all that, and it comes with an app that can monitor milk volume in real time. It seems like Elvie could be on its way to creating a “woman who has it all” scenario.

The biggest obstacle to having it all is money.

All that being said, let’s be honest. We’re all mamas here, after all. Expensive is not good for most new parents, and the original Elvie Pump is on the expensive end of the breast pump market. Further, many insurance companies don’t cover hands-free breast pumps like the Elvie Pump. That means you’ve got to pay for this really very cool breast pump out of your possibly not so flush pocket. For lots of moms, that’s a deal breaker.

Great news! The Elvie Stride is making all your breast pumping dreams come true.

Elvie has brought a new hands-free pump to the market, and this one will be 100% covered by Tricare for active duty military moms and mil-spouses and for civilian moms by most other insurance companies. That means you can apply your insurance breast pump benefit to the Elvie Stride and enjoy the benefits of a premium wearable pump without the premium price tag. The catch is that this pump is only being sold through select durable medical equipment (DME) companies, but that’s not a problem for you because we’ve got your Elvie Stride right here on this website.

Excited yet? How about we take a look under the hood of the Elvie Stride and see what makes this sleek breast pump so special (aside from the budget-friendly insurance coverage).

How does the Elvie Stride compare to the Elvie Pump?

Like the Pump, the Stride breast pump is ultra-quiet and hands-free. It slides into a standard nursing bra, just like the Pump. Like the Pump, the Stride gives you more mobility and offers freedom from needing to be plugged into an outlet or a large motor. However, there are some differences between the two pump styles.

The original Elvie Pump is designed so that each hub has its own bottle, motor, flange, etc. This design eliminates the need for a separate control and motor housing, making the Pump streamlined. However, two tiny motors increase the cost of manufacture significantly.

With the Stride, each hub has its own bottle and flange, but the two hubs share a small controller that houses a hospital strength pump motor. Since the hubs themselves do not contain motors, they’re much more compact than the Pump. This small design change also makes the Stride more affordable for more moms without sacrificing the sleek, wearable benefits that make Elvie products so user-friendly.

The Elvie Stride hubs share a single hospital strength motor housed in a hand-held controller.

The Elvie Stride hubs share a single hospital strength motor housed in a hand-held controller.

What are the benefits of the Elvie Stride?

It’s wearable.

The Elvie Stride fits into your nursing bra so that you can pull your clothes on and head out into the world ready to pump. The small controller slips right into your pocket and out of sight.

It’s ultra-quiet.

The Stride is designed with noise reduction technology so that it blends into background noise and doesn’t draw attention.

It’s smart.

The Stride connects with the free “Pump with Elvie” app that allows you to control your pump remotely while tracking your milk production.

It’s customizable.

The Stride allows you to choose from ten intensity settings in both Stimulation and Expression modes for optimal comfort and efficiency. You can also customize your pump, so it always starts with your preferred settings.

The Elvie stride fits neatly into your nursing bra in a way that is comfortable and discreet.

Elvie Stride is 100% covered by Tricare and most other breast pump benefit plans.

This wearable, hands-free breast pump is completely covered by Tricare for mil-moms and mil-spouses, and most other health insurance plans cover it, too. If you’re not sure whether your healthcare plan will cover the pump, don’t stress! As a DME company, we work with a wide range of insurance companies. We can quickly and easily verify you breast pump benefit on your behalf.

Order your Elvie Stride today and have it on your doorstep in no time.

If you’ve already got your prescription, you can attach it to our secure order form. However, if you do not have your prescription, we can speed that process up, too. When you’ve placed your order for your brand new Elvie Stride, we can request a prescription from your doctor on our side. Once your order is complete, we’ll have it in the mail straight away so you can get familiar with this new miracle of modern mamahood.

Need help? Give us a call at 1-844-Milk-Mom or email us at [email protected]

Mother is feeding newborn baby. A woman feeds a newborn with modified milk from a bottle.

Create the perfect pumping and breastfeeding schedule for you

Whether you’re returning to work or planning for a night out with the girls, pumping offers breastfeeding moms a little bit of freedom. That being said, you may feel some stress when you think about the logistics of it all. For example, how do you fit pumping into your already full schedule? Don’t worry, mama. We’ve got some ideas to help you seamlessly integrate pumping into your day.

Add pumping to your regular on demand breastfeeding schedule

If you’re able, continue to breastfeed your baby according to their usual schedule. For most babies, that’s about every two to three hours, though that may vary at different times of the day and as baby grows. To get the most out of those normal feeding sessions, pump the breast that baby is not nursing. That allows you to meet your newborn’s demands while also collecting milk for storage.

Use a newborn’s nursing schedule as your guide

If you’re unable to breastfeed on demand due to work, travel, latching difficulties, or other challenges, use your newborn’s nursing schedule to plan out your pumping sessions. As previously mentioned, that’s probably a pumping session every two to three hours during the early months. As baby grows (or if situations don’t allow for that frequency), every three to four hours will suffice.

Try cluster pumping

When they’re going through growth spurts, babies tend to “cluster pump.” That means that they nurse more frequently in shorter bursts. You can mimic this feeding style by breaking up a twenty-minute pumping session into three ten-minute pumping sessions with a five-minute break between each expression.

Add a morning pumping session

Many women tend to have fuller breasts in the morning, so try adding a session an hour before or after your baby’s morning nursing session. By the evening, most of us are tired and stressed, which inhibits the hormones that trigger the letdown effect, so adding an evening session is usually out of the question.

Recruit help and hold them to it

If you’ve got a partner in this thing called parenting, find ways to help them help you. Pumping does involve some assembly and maintenance, so ask your partner to take over that part so that you’re not solely responsible for the work involved in breastfeeding and pumping. Encourage your partner to take over some of the feeding sessions as well, using all that milk you’ve stored. You can add another pumping session while your partner cuddles and feeds baby.

Try a hands-free pumping bra to make sessions more productive

Okay, first, remember that you do not have to be productive all the time, mama. As a woman creating milk from her body, you’re doing work even when you’re doing nothing. However, we all know that even the most self-care-oriented mama often has a full to do list. A hands-free pumping bra paired with a lightweight, portable pump like the Evie or the BabyBuddha makes it a little easier to fit another pumping session into your schedule.

Find the right pump for your situation

A comfortable breast pump is critical to a successful pumping session. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

top tips for breastfeeding and pumping

Top 7 tips for combining breastfeeding and pumping

Pumping offers a number of benefits to breastfeeding mamas. Most nursing moms experience engorgement at some point. Pumping almost instantly relieves the pressure of engorged breasts. Worried about your breastmilk supply? Pumping stimulates milk production and allows you to store away milk for a future feeding – maybe even netting you a day at the spa (or work if that’s your thing). Pumping also allows your partner and other family members and caregivers to feed your little one, and you can even donate your extra milk to moms who aren’t able to breastfeed.

Use the following tips to help you make the most of your pumping sessions without interfering with those special skin-to-skin feedings.

#1 Breastfeed on demand when possible

Pumping will never replace the special bonding that happens when you nurse your baby, and on demand nursing actually boosts production during your pumping sessions. So go ahead and enjoy breastfeeding as your schedule allows.

#2 Pump frequently

Because breastmilk works by supply and demand, more pumping sessions means more breastmilk. Therefore, it’s a good idea to schedule 15─20 minute pumping sessions every three to four hours. Make the most of those sessions by double pumping.

#3 Avoid formula feedings

Formula is harder for infants to digest, which means it stays in their systems longer. That, in turn, means babies who are formula fed are hungry less frequently. Babies who aren’t hungry don’t breastfeed as often, and that interferes with the whole chain of supply and demand. In other words, the less your baby feeds, the less milk your body makes. If formula is a must, make sure to pump during formula feeding sessions to keep your milk supply up.

#4 Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate

Your breasts naturally produce breastmilk from water, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in your body. Therefore, less water in your body means less breastmilk when baby is hungry. Besides that, water is good for you, mama! Hydration is a struggle we all face, even when we’re not breastfeeding, but it’s especially important to hydrate when you’re drinking for two.

#5 Avoid dehydrating foods and drinks

Even if you drink an abundance of juice, milk, water, and other hydrating fluids, you’ll undo the good work if you’re also consuming foods and drinks that dehydrate you. High salt snacks and high sugar beverages are two culprits that contribute to dehydration. Meats also tend to dehydrate as do fried foods. And of course, alcohol, coffee, and tea can lead to dehydration, which may interfere with breastmilk production.

#6 Try meditation

Mindfulness meditation has been shown to increase relaxation, which can in turn boost breastmilk production by more than 60%! It also turns your pumping session into a self-care session, which will make you even more relaxed during those precious breastfeeding sessions.

#7 Choose your breast pump wisely

A comfortable breast pump is important to maintaining your pumping practice and will help to boost your milk supply. Conversely, an uncomfortable pump could cause you to throw in the towel early if the discomfort is too distracting. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

Breastfeeding moms need support from partners and other family members.

How can partners support breastfeeding moms?

It’s not uncommon for new parents to be nervous about all of the new responsibilities they’ll be taking on. The biological experience of pregnancy helps mothers to adjust to their new role. However, their partners may feel they’ve been dropped into the deep end when the baby arrives. It can be difficult to know how to help, and this is particularly common when mom is breastfeeding.

Some obstacles to partner support

After delivery, mom may be too tired to explain what she needs to her partner. She may not even be entirely sure what she needs. On the other hand, her partner may feel left out of the experience or even a little jealous. They might also feel powerless to do much to help or nervous about interfering with breastfeeding and mama-baby bonding.

Why supporting breastfeeding is important

Just like anyone doing something for the first time, a new mom needs support when she begins breastfeeding. It may seem that breastfeeding should come naturally. After all, women have been doing it for millennia. However, the truth is she’s probably just as nervous as her partner. She may also be worried that she’s doing something wrong. And let’s not forget that she’s tired. Really tired. Guaranteed.

But breast milk is the very best nourishment that a newborn can have. Nothing is more nutrient-rich or offers more health benefits – both long- and short-term – for babies. Breastfeeding is even good for mom, releasing feel good hormones like oxytocin and prolactin that help to reduce her stress levels and encourage faster recovery from childbirth. Plus, women who breastfeed have reduced rates of breast and ovarian cancer as well as other chronic conditions like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Breastfeeding also helps mom bond with her newborn, and it can enhance the social and emotional development of babies.

At the community level, no other form of nourishment is as sustainable as breastfeeding. It’s totally green, which benefits our environment, and healthier babies grow up to be healthier, happier, more productive community members.

How partners and other family members can help mom

Help around the house

Often, one person in a partnership is the cleaner upper. Usually, it’s the person who cares the most about a tidy, comfortable home. Unfortunately, that often tends to be the mom. When she’s breastfeeding, however, she may not have the energy to clean up. That doesn’t mean she doesn’t care or that a house gradually falling into disarray doesn’t bother her. One of the biggest ways a partner can help is by picking up the slack around the house.

Let mom sleep through the night

A good night’s sleep is critical to a recovering mom’s health, and her health is critical to her milk supply. Therefore, mama needs a good night’s sleep every once in a while. If she’s pumping, step in at night to feed the baby so that she can have the uninterrupted rest her body needs.

Be supportive of breastfeeding in public

As difficult as it is to understand, there’s still lingering controversy around breastfeeding in public. I have a mom friend in New Orleans whose mother-in-law nearly crawled under the bench in embarrassment when her daughter-in-law breastfed her hungry baby in a park. Fortunately, my friend’s husband pointed out to his mother that the worst that could happen in the Big Easy is someone throwing beads at the new mom. That’s how you support your partner when she’s breastfeeding.

Know your way around a breast pump

A breast pump can really level the playing field for parents when mom is breastfeeding. It means that she doesn’t have to be the only person feeding the baby in the middle of the night, for example. However, breast pumps are a little more work than breastfeeding. But for partners who enjoy a gadget to fiddle with, breast pump support can be the perfect job. Pumps and bottles need to be cleaned regularly, and pumps also need to be assembled after cleaning. If the pump and bottles are always at the ready for mom, her life is that much easier.

Get involved in breast pump logistics

Here’s an idea. When the mother-to-be is shopping for a breast pump, participate. Show as much interest as you might show in the search for a new computer or a new car. Breast pumps are pretty amazing machines, and they make it possible for partners to share more responsibility with breastfeeding. Take some time to read up on the best models and to learn how they work. We’ve got plenty of articles here to start with, and of course, our experts are on hand to answer all of your breast pump questions.

woman meditating with baby

Meditation, breastfeeding, and mindful mamas

Being a mom is often overwhelming. It’s not easy being responsible for a whole other human (even less so when you’re responsible for a few of them). Moms frequently feel lost in a brain fog. Even though breastfeeding is linked to that feel good hormone oxytocin, it’s not uncommon to feel “touched out” after a day of nursing. Mindfulness meditation is one way to re-center yourself on those challenging days. And it may be good for breastmilk production, too.

What is mindfulness meditation?

Mindfulness meditation is exactly what it sounds like – a practice that combines meditation and mindfulness. Meditation is a centuries old practice that has been used in nearly every culture and religion to encourage calm, centeredness, focus, and awareness. In its most basic form, it is sitting or lying comfortably and focusing on your breath, a mantra, or a specific object. However, writing in a journal, walking, and breastfeeding can all become a meditative practice if you are practicing mindfulness. Mindfulness is simply drawing your focus to the present moment and being fully involved in the experience of it.

The benefits of meditation for breastfeeding moms

Being a new mom can be a stressful time, especially when you’re juggling breastfeeding with work and other responsibilities. It’s not uncommon to feel exhausted and even depressed as a new mother. According to Mayo Clinic, meditation is a “simple, fast way to reduce stress” while cultivating inner peace. Research suggests that meditation helps to clear away information overload while offering a new perspective on stressful situations. It can reduce negative feelings while increasing patience. Research even suggests meditation may improve some medical conditions that are aggravated by stress, for example, anxiety, chronic pain, and tension headaches.

Meditation and breastmilk production

Notably, new research suggests that meditation may boost breastmilk production and even make pumping a more pleasant experience. How? The hormone oxytocin plays an important role in breastfeeding, as it triggers the let-down reflex and encourages mother-infant bonding. Studies show that stress hormones play a role in reducing milk production and inhibiting milk transfer by interfering with the production of oxytocin. According to one study, mindfulness meditation leads to the release of oxytocin in the brain, promoting a sense of well-being and stimulating bonding. More importantly to breastfeeding mothers, that release of oxytocin may stimulate breastmilk production.

Meditation while pumping for improved production

In another study, women who listened to a relaxation tape while pumping for twenty minutes a day had a 63% increase in milk production compared with the control group. Imagine that! Using your pumping session as an opportunity to meditate can boost your breastmilk production and improve your mood, your patience, and your stress levels.

How to practice mindfulness meditation while pumping

  1. GET COMFORTABLE. Find a cozy, quiet spot where you won’t be disturbed. (This is a good time to call on your partner to run interference and protect your peace.) Attach your breast pump (or pumps if you are double-pumping) and find your maximum comfortable vacuum.
  2. FOCUS ON YOUR BREATHING. Close your eyes and focus your attention on the rise and fall of your breath. Breathe in deeply, and when you release your breath, imagine stress and tension leaving your body.
  3. SCAN YOUR BODY. As you breathe in and out, scan your body from head to toe, noticing tension and letting it go. Keep breathing and allow your attention to your breathing to ground you if your mind begins to wander.
  4. BE KIND TO YOURSELF. You have many distractions in your life right now, many responsibilities, and your brain is likely to try to tiptoe back to those thoughts that cause you stress. That’s okay. Make a note of the thoughts and then gently bring your attention back to your breathing.
  5. REPEAT DAILY. For maximum rewards, repeat this practice at least twice a day for twenty minutes each.

A comfortable breast pump is important for this practice as it won’t distract you or cause discomfort. If you’re not sure which breast pump is right for you, get in touch with your friends at Milk N Mamas Baby. We can help you choose a pump that maximizes both your comfort and your breastmilk production.

young breastfeeding mother checking Aetna insurance plan online

What breastfeeding moms need to know about their Aetna health plan

Aetna health plans cover breastfeeding equipment and sometimes more

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, insurance providers are required to cover personal use breast pumps for new and expecting mothers. If you’re covered by Aetna, you can choose a manual or electric pump. Several different brands of breast pumps are 100% covered, including the Luna Motif, Spectra S2, and Medela Pump in Style with Max Flow. In addition, your Aetna plan may also cover up to six visits with a lactation consultant if you need breastfeeding support.

What are the limitations of Aetna breastfeeding equipment coverage?

Moms only get one benefit with Aetna. Therefore, if you choose to get a 100% covered manual pump, you can’t also get a fully covered electric breast pump. It’s one or the other.

In the past, many Aetna plans were also limited in terms of how often you were able to receive a new pump. While many insurance providers allowed one plan per birth event, Aetna restricted moms to one breast pump during a 36-month period. However, in a 2020 clinical policy bulletin, Aetna stated that “ a replacement manual or standard electrical breast pump is considered medically necessary for each subsequent pregnancy, for initiation or continuation of breastfeeding during pregnancy or following delivery.”

However, the same policy bulletin stated that “the purchase of heavy duty electrical (hospital grade) breast pumps [are] not medically necessary.”

Replacement supplies that are strictly for comfort and convenience, such as replacement polycarbonate bottles, replacement caps, nipples, or lids for breast pump bottle, and replacement locking rings, are not covered. Furthermore, some grandfathered Aetna plans that pre-date the March 23, 2010 ACA may not follow all of the requirements for coverage of breast pumps.

Not sure what your policy covers?

Don’t worry. We can give Aetna a call and confirm your benefit coverage for you.

Aside from the coverage, you’ll need a prescription to qualify for your 100% covered breast pump. You can upload it easily when your place your order (though a prescription is not required when placing an order). If your hands are full, we can even contact your doctor and request a prescription on your behalf. Once you’ve placed your order, we’ll get your new pump to you quickly and with absolutely no cost to you. Even our shipping is free, and we service Aetna moms anywhere in the U.S.A.

How does suction intensity affect my milk supply?

How does suction intensity affect my milk supply?

How is breast pump suction measured?

If you check the product description of your favorite breast pump, you’ll see the suction documented as mmHG, or millimeters of mercury. The more mmHG, the more intense the suction. At Milk N Mamas Baby, we carry breast pumps with a range of suction intensity, from the Medela at a maximum strength of 240 mmHG to the BabyBuddha at a whopping 320 mmHG of maximum strength. In between, are Luna at 280 mmHG and Spectra at a maximum strength of 270 mmHG.

Main Takeaway: Breast pump suction, or vacuum, usually falls between 220 and 350 mmHG.

Is a breast pump with a stronger suction intensity better?

Suction does play a role in milk production. A study published in Breastfeeding Medicine analyzed the effect of strength of suction on the flow rate and volume of breastmilk using an electric breast pump. Mothers participating in the study expressed breastmilk for 15 minutes using a pump set at their own maximum comfortable vacuum. Then, they expressed at softer vacuums. The study found that milk flow was greater at the maximum comfortable vacuum, and cream content was higher.

Main takeaway: Pumping at the highest intensity you’re comfortable with is likely to lead to increased milk flow and cream content.

Maximum comfortable vacuum may vary from one mother to another (or even from one feeding session to another)

It hardly needs to be said that every mother is different and, therefore, every mother’s maximum comfortable vacuum will also be different. However, your maximum comfort vacuum may change from day to day and even from feeding session to feeding session. While pumping at your maximum comfort vacuum can increase flow, pumping at an uncomfortable suction can hinder milk flow. If a suction level is set too high, it can cause breast tissue to compress, which can block the flow of milk ducts and potentially irritate them. Furthermore, if the suction level is uncomfortable, your body is less likely to produce the oxytocin that helps stimulate letdown.

Main takeaway: Increase your suction intensity until it is just slightly uncomfortable, and then back it down to find your own, personal maximum comfort vacuum.

Talk to our consultants to learn more about the breast pump most likely to meet your needs

At Milk N Mamas Baby, we know that different moms need different pumping solutions. We’ve had years of experience helping all kids of moms find the best breast pump for their circumstances. Give us a call today to learn how we can help you find a breast pump that meets your needs and your budget. Many of our pumps are 100% covered by insurance.

Can I get a breast pump with my insurance?

Does my health insurance cover a free breast pump?

When Milk N Mamas Baby founder Krisi LaMont was just starting out in the industry, she worked for a medical equipment supply company. One of the mothers Krisi served was eager to try breastfeeding her infant in the NICU. She knew it would improve the baby’s immune system. However, at the time, breastfeeding supplies weren’t covered by insurance, and money was tight for the mom. Too tight for a breast pump rental.

Krisi knew that the mother’s instinct about the benefits of breast milk were spot on. She believed it was unfair that some mothers and infants would be denied the opportunity to establish a breastfeeding routine due to the costs. She lobbied on behalf of that mother and worked out a contract with a State Medicaid Plan to ensure personal use breast pumps and hospital grade breast pumps were covered for all nursing mothers.

Today, most moms are eligible for completely free breast pumps thanks to the Affordable Care Act. The ACA requires that insurers cover breastfeeding support as part of a mother and baby’s preventative health care services.

What’s the catch?

While there’s no catch, per se, not all health plans are made the same. Furthermore, the ACA doesn’t offer specific instructions regarding the matter of breast pump coverage. That means that coverage may vary from one health plan to another. This could affect the amount covered by your health plan as well as types of pumps included in coverage.

How can Milk N Mamas Baby help me get my insurance-covered breast pump?

We can confirm your insurance covered breast pump benefit.

We do the work for you by confirming your insurance-covered benefit for you once you have placed the order. We are familiar with all the insurance benefit plans we work with, so we can provide you the most up-to-date and accurate information about your breast pump coverage. If you order a pump from us, and we do not participate with your insurance, we can send you to a provider who does participate with the plan.

We can request a prescription for a pump from your doctor.

If you’ve already got your prescription, you can attach it to your secure order form. However, if you do not have your prescription already, we can help with that too. We can request a prescription from your doctor once you’ve placed your order, so you don’t have to be bothered. In other words, we are a direct liason between you, your doctor, and your insurance company.

Milk n Mamas Baby is a contracted insurance supplier, meaning we can help you get your free breast pump delivered quickly. All you have to do is visit our website to pick out the breast pump that best meets your needs. Then, fill out our simple, secure online form. We’ll take it from there! Need help? Give us a call at 1-844-Milk-Mom or email us at [email protected]

Is it safe to use marijuana while breastfeeding?

How legalizing cannabis changes our view of it

After years of debate, the U.S. House passed a bill to legalize marijuana at the federal level in 2020. It looks as if prospects for the federal decriminalization of marijuana may be just around the corner. For many Americans, this is a welcome change as medical marijuana has many benefits with few side effects. This may send the message that cannabis is safe to use while breastfeeding. However, evidence has shown that marijuana use can be harmful to nursing babies.

How does weed affect breastmilk?

Marijuana has more than 400 chemicals, including cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinal (THC), the plant’s main pychoactive component. When a breastfeeding mother uses cannabis, some of the chemicals get into her milk supply. According to a study conducted in 2018, more than 6 in 10 women who used weed had detectable levels of THC in their breastmilk samples up to six days after their last use. Another study found that it could stay in a woman’s system for as long as six weeks.

This is likely due to the fact that breastmilk is highly fatty, and both THC and CBD bind heavily to fats. While alcohol is dispensed from breastmilk at the same rate it leaves the blood, the chemicals found in marijuana tend to build up in breastmilk. In fact, the same report found that a mother could have eight times as much THC in her milk as in her blood.

How do THC and CBD affect newborns?

Very little human research has been conducted in recent years, so it’s hard to say with 100% certainty how THC and CBD affect newborns. A study of suckling mice exposed to cannabis extract showed decreased weight gain. A study of rats exposed to THC in utero found that exposure leads to lasting neurodevelopmental impairment. What these mean for human babies is hard to say.

However, THC does inhibit the production of prolactin, the hormone that controls milk production. Further, some studies have shown that babies exposed to THC may not nurse as long or as vigorously.

What does the CDC say about using marijuana while breastfeeding?

While data is currently limited on the effects of marijuana use while breastfeeding, the CDC provides the following guidance:

Data on the effects of marijuana and CBD exposure to the infant through breastfeeding are limited and conflicting. To limit potential risk to the infant, breastfeeding mothers should be advised not to use marijuana or marijuana-containing products in any form, including those containing CBD, while breastfeeding.

Talk to your doctor about using marijuana while breastfeeding

If you’ve been using marijuana medicinally, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor about how to proceed while you’re breastfeeding. They will be able to advise you on possible alternatives or best use scenarios.